Pilgrim’s Progress, Part 1: Context and Concerns

The Seventies: The Final Chapter

The neoevangelical movement arose primarily after the end of the Second World War. Of course, the movement had antecedents. For example, when the National Association of Evangelicals was formed in 1942, it explicitly rejected fundamentalist ideas about separation from...
Pilgrim’s Progress, Part 1: Context and Concerns

The Seventies: Part Six

In the early 1970s Bill Gothard had begun to teach a series of practical Bible studies to large groups. In 1974 he began to call these the “Seminar on Basic Youth Conflicts.” They became famous for the red notebooks that attendees used. These seminars...
Pilgrim’s Progress, Part 1: Context and Concerns

The Seventies: Part Five

The 1970s were an important decade for the evangelical doctrine of Scripture in more than one way. As we have seen, these years witnessed the beginning of a “battle for the Bible” during which evangelicals divided over biblical inerrancy. The inerrancy...
Pilgrim’s Progress, Part 1: Context and Concerns

The Seventies: Part Four

The 1970s proved to be an important turning point for the evangelical doctrine of Scripture. Going into the decade, fundamentalists and other evangelicals shared a broad consensus (at least publicly) over the notion that inspiration was both verbal and plenary and...
Pilgrim’s Progress, Part 1: Context and Concerns

The Seventies: Part Three

In 1970 American evangelicalism was divided into three main camps. A minority on the far right called for separation from all forms of apostasy, including the liberal denominations and the Roman Catholic Church: these were the separatist fundamentalists. A minority on...